do I have to worry about hepatitis c?

What is hepatitis? “Hepatitis” means inflammation of the liver. Toxins, certain drugs, some diseases, heavy alcohol use, and bacterial and viral infections can all cause hepatitis. Hepatitis is also the name of a family of viral infections that affect the liver; the most common types are Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. What is the difference between Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C? Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C are diseases caused by three different viruses. Although each can cause similar

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when do i have to worry about cholesterol?

If you think you\’re too young to worry about your cholesterol, new research suggests you might think again. In a 20-year study involving 3,258 people between 18 and 30 years old, researchers found that the cumulative effect of even modestly abnormal cholesterol heightens your risk of developing telltale signs of heart disease by age 45. Enlarge Image Getty ImagesStudy: Keep cholesterol low in youth for a benefit later. Exercise is key. As is the case with heart disease in older

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is alcohol bad for diabetes?

Beyond all the health and safety concerns about alcohol, if you have diabetes and are on diabetes medications that lower blood glucose, you need to practice caution. The action of insulin and some diabetes pills, sulfonylureas and meglitinides (Prandin), is to lower blood glucose by making more insulin. So, you should not drink when your blood glucose is low or when your stomach is empty. Alcohol can cause hypoglycemia shortly after drinking and for 24 hours after drinking. So, if

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diet for gout prevention

Gout, a painful form of arthritis, has long been associated with diet, particularly overindulgence in meat, seafood and alcohol. As a result, gout treatment used to include severe dietary restrictions, which made the gout diet hard to stick to. Fortunately, newer medications to treat gout have reduced the need for such a strict diet. Newer diet recommendations resemble a healthy-eating plan recommended for most people. Besides helping you maintain a healthy weight and avoid several chronic diseases, this diet may

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high blood pressure diet

DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. The DASH diet is a lifelong approach to healthy eating that\’s designed to help treat or prevent high blood pressure (hypertension). The DASH diet encourages you to reduce the sodium in your diet and eat a variety of foods rich in nutrients that help lower blood pressure, such as potassium, calcium and magnesium. By following the DASH diet, you may be able to reduce your blood pressure by a few points in

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diet for diabetes

A crucial tool in controlling diabetes is being vigilant about what you put in your mouth. But, some experts say, you don\’t have to be a slave to the glycemic index or banish cake and ice cream forever. The primary goal for diabetics is to regulate their blood glucose (sugar) levels because they can\’t rely on their bodies to naturally produce enough insulin, the hormone that shuttles glucose from the bloodstream into cells. With Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas stops

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beauty in medicine

I’ve been asked to appear on a radio talk show to discuss one of my blog articles.  It seems that the producers of the show were impressed by my article on the beauty of medicine when it works the way it’s supposed to. “When It Works Right, It’s a Thing of Beauty” was published this summer and is one of my favorite articles.  The practice of medicine is a beautiful thing.  When I first started in medicine over 30 years

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Confidentiality in medicine and health care

Patient Confidentiality Physicians have always had a duty to keep their patients\’ confidences. In essence, the physician\’s duty to maintain confidentiality means that a physician may not disclose any medical information revealed by a patient or discovered by a physician in connection with the treatment of a patient. In general, AMA\’s Code of Medical Ethics states that the information disclosed to a physician during the course of the patient-physician relationship is confidential to the utmost degree. As explained by the AMA\’s Council

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